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imageMy live Q&A after Friday’s The Future of C++ talk is now online on Channel 9. The topics revolved around…

… recent progress and near-future directions for C++, both at Microsoft and across the industry, and talks about some announcements related to C++11 support in VC++ 2012 and the formation of the Standard C++ Foundation.

Herb takes questions from a live virtual audience and demos the new http://isocpp.org site on an 82 inch Perceptive Pixel display attached to a Windows 8 machine.

Thanks to everyone who tuned in.

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imageYesterday, many thousands of you were in the room or live online for my talk on The Future of C++. The talk is now available online.

This has been a phenomenal year for C++, since C++11’s publication just 12 months ago. And yesterday was a great day for C++.

Yesterday I had the privilege of announcing much of what Microsoft and the industry have been working on over the past year.

(minor) C++ at Microsoft

On September 12, we shipped VC++ 2012 with the complete C++11 standard library, and adding support for C++11 range-for, enum class, override and final. Less than two months later, yesterday we announced and shipped the November 2012 CTP, a compiler add-in to VC++ 2012 adding C++11 variadic templates, uniform initialization and initializer_lists, delegating constructors, function template default arguments, explicit conversion operators, and raw string literals. Details here, and download here.

Note that this is just the first batch of additional C++11 features. Expect further announcements and deliveries in the first half of 2013.

(major) C++ across the industry

Interest and investment in C++ continues to accelerate across the software world.

  • ISO C++ standardization is accelerating. Major companies are dedicating more people and resources to C++ standardization than they have in years. Over the next 24 months, we plan to ship three Technical Specifications and a new C++ International Standard.
  • C++ now has a home on the web at isocpp.org. Launched yesterday, it both aggregates the best C++ content and hosts new content itself, including Bjarne Stroustrup’s new Tour of C++ and Scott Meyers’ new Universal References article.
  • We now have a Standard C++ Foundation. Announced yesterday, it is already funded by the largest companies in the industry down to startups, financial institutions to universities, book publishers to other consortia, with more members joining weekly. For the first time in C++’s history since AT&T relinquished control of the language, we have an entity – a trade organization – that exists exclusively to promote Standard C++ on all compilers and platforms, and companies are funding it because the world runs on C++, and investing in Standard C++ is good business.

This is an exciting time to be part of our industry, on any OS and using any language. It’s especially an exciting time to be involved with C++ on all compilers and platforms.

Thank you all, whatever platform and language you use, for being part of it.

Links:

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A few hours ago I sat down to give a short teaser for my webcast talk this Friday.

Here it is. Feel free to forward.

(I don’t think they believed me when I said I could keep it to under two minutes.)

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imageIn my talk on Friday, there will be announcements of broad interest to C++ developers on all compilers and platforms. Please help spread the word.

The Future of C++

Friday, November 2, 2012
12:45pm (U.S. Pacific Time)

This talk will give an update on recent progress and near-future directions for C++, both at Microsoft and across the industry, with some announcements of interest in both areas. The speaker is the lead language architect of Visual C++ and chair of the ISO C++ committee.

The talk will be webcast live on Channel 9, and available soon afterwards on demand.

If you know people who are interested in C++, on any platform, you’ll want to let them know to tune in.

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The first panel from C++ and Beyond 2012 is now available on Channel 9:

On Static If, C++11 in 2012, Modern Libraries, and Metaprogramming

Andrei Alexandrescu, Scott Meyers, Herb Sutter

Channel 9 was invited to this year’s C++ and Beyond to film some sessions (that will appear on C9 over the coming months!)…

At the end of day 2, Andrei, Herb and Scott graciously agreed to spend some time discussing various modern C++ topics and, even better, answering questions from the community. In fact, the questions from Niners (and a conversation on reddit/r/cpp) drove the conversation.

Here’s what happened…

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At the end of the Monday afternoon session, I will be making a special announcement related to Standard C++ on all platforms. Be there to hear the details, and to receive an extra perk that’s being reserved for C&B 2012 attendees only.

  • Note: We sometimes record sessions and make them freely available online via Channel 9, and we intend to do that again this year for some selected sessions. However, this session is for C&B attendees only and will not be recorded.

Registration is open until Wednesday and the event is pretty full but a few spaces are still available. I’m looking forward to seeing many of you there for a top-notch C++ conference full of fresh new current material – I’ve seen Andrei’s and Scott’s talk slides too, and I think this C&B is going to be the best one yet.

You’ll leave exhausted, but with a full brain and quite likely a big silly grin as you think about all the ways to use the material right away on your current project back home.

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imageHere’s another deep session for C&B 2012 on August 5-8 – if you haven’t registered yet, register soon. We got a bigger venue this time, but as I write this the event is currently almost 75% full with five weeks to go.

I know, I’ve already posted three sessions and a panel. But there’s just so much about C++11 to cover, so here’s a fourth brand-new session I’ll do at C&B 2012 that goes deeper on its topic than I’ve ever been willing to go before.

atomic<> Weapons: The C++11 Memory Model and Modern Hardware

This session in one word: Deep.

It’s a session that includes topics I’ve publicly said for years is Stuff You Shouldn’t Need To Know and I Just Won’t Teach, but it’s becoming achingly clear that people do need to know about it. Achingly, heartbreakingly clear, because some hardware incents you to pull out the big guns to achieve top performance, and C++ programmers just are so addicted to full performance that they’ll reach for the big red levers with the flashing warning lights. Since we can’t keep people from pulling the big red levers, we’d better document the A to Z of what the levers actually do, so that people don’t SCRAM unless they really, really, really meant to.

This session covers:

  • The facts: The C++11 memory model and what it requires you to do to make sure your code is correct and stays correct. We’ll include clear answers to several FAQs: “how do the compiler and hardware cooperate to remember how to respect these rules?”, “what is a race condition?”, and the ageless one-hand-clapping question “how is a race condition like a debugger?”
  • The tools: The deep interrelationships and fundamental tradeoffs among mutexes, atomics, and fences/barriers. I’ll try to convince you why standalone memory barriers are bad, and why barriers should always be associated with a specific load or store.
  • The unspeakables: I’ll grudgingly and reluctantly talk about the Thing I Said I’d Never Teach That Programmers Should Never Need To Now: relaxed atomics. Don’t use them! If you can avoid it. But here’s what you need to know, even though it would be nice if you didn’t need to know it.
  • The rapidly-changing hardware reality: How locks and atomics map to hardware instructions on ARM and x86/x64, and throw in POWER and Itanium for good measure – and I’ll cover how and why the answers are actually different last year and this year, and how they will likely be different again a few years from now. We’ll cover how the latest CPU and GPU hardware memory models are rapidly evolving, and how this directly affects C++ programmers.
  • Coda: Volatile and “compiler-only” memory barriers. It’s important to understand exactly what atomic and volatile are and aren’t for. I’ll show both why they’re both utterly unrelated (they have exactly zero overlapping uses, really) and yet are fundamentally related when viewed from the perspective of talking about the memory model. Also, people keep seeing and asking about “compiler-only” memory barriers and when to use them – they do have a valid-though-rare use, but it’s not the use that most people are trying to use them for, so beware!

For me, this is going to be the deepest and most fun C&B yet. At previous C&Bs I’ve spoken about not only code, but also meta topics like design and C++’s role in the marketplace. This time it looks like all my talks will be back to Just Code. Fun times!

Here a snapshot of the list of C&B 2012 sessions so far:

Universal References in C++11 (Scott)
You Don’t Know [keyword] and [keyword] (Herb)
Convincing Your Colleagues (Panel)
Initial Thoughts on Effective C++11 (Scott)
Modern C++ = Clean, Safe, and Faster Than Ever (Panel)
Error Resilience in C++11 (Andrei)
C++ Concurrency – 2012 State of the Art (and Standard) (Herb)
C++ Parallelism – 2012 State of the Art (and Standard) (Herb)
Secrets of the C++11 Threading API (Scott)
atomic<> Weapons: The C++11 Memory Model and Modern Hardware (Herb)

It’ll be a blast. I hope to see many of you there. Register soon.

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